University World News Global Edition
15 February 2015 Issue 0354 Register to receive our free e-newspaper by email each week Advanced Search
NEWSLETTER
Internationalisation has
a vital role to play in
giving peace a chance


In this week’s edition, in our World Blog, Philip Altbach and Hans de Wit say that at a time of increasing global tension, higher education needs to be aware that international cooperation and exchange are not guarantees for peace and mutual understanding, but they are vital for keeping channels of communication open.
In Features, Alejandro Ortiz, Li Chang and Yuanyuan Fang report that international students contributed US$27 billion to the US economy last year, up by 12%, and their impact goes way beyond money spent on tuition fees and living expenses.
In Commentary, Francisco Marmolejo asks if the way to fund a more equitable system of higher education really is as simple as making the rich pay more through tuition fees or needs a more complex response.
Jonathan Michie says society faces problems and challenges as great as ever – whether it’s climate change, increasing inequality or conflict and civil war – and that is why the social sciences matter.
Jaehee Cho and Hongsik Yu say the host university is one of the most fundamental sources of social support for international students, giving them a sense of belonging and determining how they feel about and engage with their university.
And Esther Wilkinson says IT departments are being kept in the dark about their own university’s efforts to offer courses and qualifications in other countries, despite being vital to those efforts.
Brendan O’Malley – Managing Editor
NEWS: Our correspondents worldwide report
GLOBAL
Nic Mitchell

France dominated new higher education rankings for internationalisation last week – taking six of the 27 top spots. The rankings based on ‘international orientation’ were produced by U-Multirank, the independent consortium seed-funded by the European Commission.
MYANMAR
Naw Say Phaw Waa

Agreement has been reached in talks between student representatives and the government on criticisms of the unpopular National Education Law. Following negotiations held between the two sides on 11 February, Hla Tun, a representative from the President’s Office, said a bill would be submitted as early as this Monday.
DENMARK
Jan Petter Myklebust

The number of citizens from EU member countries receiving funding from the Danish Students’ Grants and Loans Scheme grew more than tenfold from 2012 to 2014 – from 441 to 4,647 – following a ruling in the European Court of Justice that the Danish authorities should be paying grants to European students who earn an income in Denmark.
EUROPE
Brendan O’Malley

The European University Association, representing 850 institutions, has called on the European Parliament to reject a plan that would make deep cuts in the European research programme, Horizon 2020.
TAIWAN
Mimi Leung

One hundred and nineteen members of the student protest movement have been charged with various criminal offences for involvement in protests that successfully blocked the government’s attempts to force through a trade law with China last year.
SOUTH AFRICA
Munyaradzi Makoni

Two universities in South Africa have been hit by student protests ahead of the new academic year. Tshwane University of Technology campuses were closed last Thursday as protests on some campuses began spilling over to others. Earlier in the week Walter Sisulu University's Buffalo City Campus reopened after being shut due to funding-related disruptions.
AUSTRALIA
Geoff Maslen

The federal government’s cuts to research spending and its plans to deregulate university fees appear to be forcing increasing numbers of the nation’s brightest young academics to leave the country.
UNITED KINGDOM
Brendan O’Malley

The national academies have urged whoever wins power in the May General Election to place research and innovation at the heart of plans for long-term economic growth and to embed expert advice across government.
UNITED STATES
Maddy Berner, The Chronicle of Higher Education

Enrolments in foreign-language courses at American colleges declined after nearly 20 years of growth, falling 6.7% from autumn 2009 to autumn 2013, according to a report released last Wednesday by the Modern Language Association – and American Sign Language is now studied by more people than German.
UGANDA
Gilbert Nganga

Barely a fortnight after a TV exposé unearthed a diploma mill at one of Kenya’s leading aviation colleges, Uganda’s top university launched a probe into an alleged racket involving fake degrees awarded to students.
THAILAND
Suluck Lamubol

A traditional university event that gives students rein to light-heartedly criticise politicians is the latest target of Thailand’s military government crackdown on criticism of the regime.
GLOBAL
Wagdy Sawahel

France has announced the launch of the first programmes of a new foundation, called AfricaFrance, which is aimed among other things at providing professional training and supporting human capital development in Africa. One initiative, LeaD Campus, will deliver management training in Africa and will involve French and African higher education institutions.
FEATURES
UNITED STATES
Alejandro Ortiz, Li Chang and Yuanyuan Fang

International students contributed almost US$27 billion to the US economy in 2014, up 12% on 2013, an impact that goes way beyond money spent on tuition fees and living expenses.
SWEDEN
Jan Petter Myklebust

Leading Swedish academics are calling for a major shift in higher education and research policies under the new government. But can it deliver?
WORLD BLOG
GLOBAL
Philip Altbach and Hans de Wit

At a time of increasing global tension, higher education needs to be aware that international cooperation and exchange are not guarantees for peace and mutual understanding, but they are vital for keeping channels of communication open.
COMMENTARY
GLOBAL
Francisco Marmolejo

How do you fund a more equitable system of access to higher education? The solution cannot only be about who pays and how, as different countries’ circumstances show.
GLOBAL
Jonathan Michie

Society faces problems and challenges as great as ever – whether it’s climate change, growing inequality or conflict – and that is why the analysis and understanding of human behaviour provided by the social sciences is vital.
UNITED STATES
Jaehee Cho and Hongsik Yu

The host university is one of the most fundamental sources of social support for international students, giving them a sense of belonging and determining how they feel about and engage with their university.
UNITED KINGDOM
Esther Wilkinson

Research shows IT is often left out of the equation when transnational education programmes are established, often due to the speed with which they are set up, although IT can be vital to their success.
CLIMATE CHANGE
GLOBAL
Geoff Maslen

An international team of researchers has found that the disappearance of seagrass meadows in the world’s oceans could be contributing to the release of carbon dioxide that has been stored for centuries under the sea.
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WORLD ROUND-UP
SPAIN

Education Minister José Ignacio Wert has been accused of many things, but never of shying away from controversy. Now, in a year filled with tight electoral contests, Wert is taking aim at one of the most incendiary political issues on the national agenda – Spain’s chronically underperforming universities, writes Tobias Buck for Financial Times.
NETHERLANDS

A few years ago it would have been unthinkable, but now Dutch universities are competing with each other for masters students, reports Dutch News.
UNITED KINGDOM

The head of a leading private university has said universities should stop demanding extra cash from the public purse and use their resources more wisely, writes Claire Shaw for the Guardian.
SOUTH AFRICA

A Council on Higher Education proposal to extend tertiary undergraduate studies by a year to improve student performance stands a good chance of being snubbed by the government, writes Bongani Nkosi for the Mail & Guardian.
NIGERIA

The National Universities Commission has abolished the pass degree in all Nigerian universities with effect from the 2013-14 academic session. The Vice-Chancellor of Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Professor Abdullahi Zuru, made this known at its 2014-15 matriculation ceremony, writes Mohammed Aminu for This Day.
AUSTRALIA

A report has found that public funding for private training colleges should be capped amid soaring profits, which are encouraging rogue operators to flood the higher education market, writes Steve Lillebuen for The Age.
INDIA

Japanese universities are going all out to give their American and European counterparts a run for their money in wooing Indian students for higher education studies, writes Amit Mitra for The Hindu. Their unique selling proposition: study in a top notch university in Japan for nearly half the cost of studying in the West.
SOUTH AFRICA

Jewish students at the Durban University of Technology who supported the State of Israel should be kicked out, the Student Representative Council has demanded. And this applies to students who are sponsored by the Israeli government. The demands, sent to the institution’s management, have shocked and angered Jewish organisations, writes Mpathi Nxumalo for the Daily News.
CHINA

A Chinese state-backed newspaper recently defended a mainland student running for university office in Hong Kong against what it described as a dangerous "McCarthyite trend" in the former British colony, writes Clare Baldwin for Reuters.
CANADA

Canadian universities have used the temporary foreign worker programme to recruit for approximately a quarter of their new permanent jobs over the past five years, federal government statistics show – and schools are urging the government to relax new rules they say are hurting their ability to recruit internationally, writes Simona Chiose for The Globe and Mail.
UNITED KINGDOM

Universities are planning to ban students from wearing anything on their wrists during examinations, for fear they may use smartwatches to access the internet and cheat, reports Sky News.
JAPAN

The nation’s seven foreign-studies universities are planning to train a battalion of potentially thousands of students to work as interpreters during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Together the students will cover 27 languages and hopefully comprise a valuable asset to be deployed at conferences and other sporting events in the years ahead, writes Masaaki Kameda for The Japan Times.
GLOBAL

Academics and students alike should be making better use of Wikipedia, a major study of digital technology use in higher education has recommended, reports the Monash website.
UNITED STATES

Harvard University banned professors from having “s exual or romantic relationships” with undergraduates, joining a list of campuses that have taken similar steps, writes John Lauerman for Bloomberg.
CANADA

A Queen’s University professor under fire for using anti-vaccination material in a health course will no longer be teaching that course, writes Ethan Lou for the Star.
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