28 April 2017 Register to receive our free newsletter by email each week
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World Round-up
AUSTRALIA
University 2060 – Brave new world of higher education
Higher education, 2060: academics are out of a job. All the brand name universities have made all their courses free online, easily doing away with one side of the teaching and learning equation, writes Phillip Riley of Monash University for The Conversation. Pretty soon all the universities realised how much money they could save.
UNITED STATES
Why higher education must be part of immigration reform
Last week, President Barack Obama and a bipartisan group of senators outlined a plan for comprehensive immigration reform. Like the DREAM Act that has stalled for years in Congress, the proposal’s outline hints at an expedited pathway to citizenship for young people who came to the US as children if they attend college or serve in the military, writes Wendy Kopp for TIME.
UNITED KINGDOM
University student marketing spend up 22%
UK universities increased spending on marketing to potential students by nearly a quarter in the run-up to the introduction of higher fees, a Times Higher Education investigation has found, reports David Matthews. Yet they suffered a 7.4% fall in applications.
KAZAKHSTAN
World Bank brings Nazarbayev University to Kazakhstan
On 16 December 2011, Kazakhstan state security forces opened fire on striking oil workers in the Caspian Sea company town of Zhanaozen. The massacre seemingly went unnoticed by Western faculty members and administrators working at the recently opened Nazarbayev University, located in the country’s ostentatious capital Astana, write Allen Ruff and Steve Horn for The Real News.
YEMEN
Strike paralyses five public universities
Majdi Alsaqaf, a final-year student at Sana'a University, is excited about the prospect of pending graduation. But a coordinated strike by administrative staff at Sana’a, Dhamar, Taiz, Ibb and Amran universities against new legislation has put the fate of thousands of final-year students in jeopardy, writes Ali Ibrahim Almoshiki for Yemen Times.
UNITED STATES
Wealthy universities sue students over loan defaults
Graduate student borrowers are defaulting on almost US$1 billion in federal loans that were given out to the poor. Universities in the United States such as Yale, Penn State and George Washington are going after them in the courts, suing for non-payment, reports RT.
PAKISTAN
University leaders concerned about HEC amendment bill
Vice-chancellors representing 137 public and private universities in Pakistan last Tuesday expressed reservations to members of a National Assembly standing committee regarding the proposed Higher Education Commission Amendment Bill, reports Pakistan Today.
CHINA
Rich give generously to universities
China's rich are showing increasing enthusiasm for making big donations to the non-profit sector and most of their donations, including pledges, went to universities in 2012, according to a new report, writes He Dan for China Daily.
MALAYSIA
Prime minister launches top-up study loans scheme
Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak last week launched the Skim Prihatin Pendidikan 1Malaysia scheme to assist students at the tertiary level with obtaining additional study loans, reports the official Bernama news agency.
INDONESIA
Government to scrap university enrolment fees
The Indonesian government says it has increased assistance funds for higher education institutions so that state universities can eliminate initial student enrolment fees starting this year, reports The Jakarta Post.
INDIA
Higher education has hit a low, says prime minister
With Indian universities repeatedly failing to figure among the top 200 universities in the world, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, in a surprisingly candid speech last Tuesday, acknowledged that the quality of higher education in India left much to be desired, reports India Today.
UNITED STATES
Duke fraternity suspended over Asian-themed party
The Kappa Sigma fraternity at Duke University in the United States was suspended by its parent organisation after throwing an Asian-themed party – complete with conical hats, geisha outfits and intentional misspellings – that sparked protests by Asian students on campus, writes Kristene Quan for TIME.
FRANCE
Students at elite universities disciplined for sexism
A club at the former elite French college of shamed ex-IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn advocated gang rape and suggested carrying out a simulated sexual attack on a feminist organisation, writes Daniel Miller for the Daily Mail.
SYRIA
Aleppo University soldiers on after mystery blasts
The twin explosions two weeks ago that killed more than 80 people and wounded 150 also left Aleppo student Laila determined to return to the university as exams and normal class schedules resumed last Tuesday for the first time since the blasts, write Patrick J McDonnell and Lava Selo for Los Angeles Times.
GREECE
University streamlining to reduce entrants by a third
A plan to streamline Greece’s higher education system, leaving fewer departments offering courses on the most popular subjects and abolishing those with scant demand, was unveiled on Thursday by Education Minister Constantinos Arvanitopoulos, reports Ekathimerini.
UNITED KINGDOM
Open access plans come under fire from scholars
Under proposals backed by David Willetts, the UK universities minister, publicly funded research will shift to an ‘open access’ model by 2014, allowing anyone in the world to access the latest studies online without having to pay, writes Nick Collins for The Telegraph.
UNITED KINGDOM
Call to cut overseas students from migration targets
The chairs of five parliamentary committees have written to British Prime Minister David Cameron to urge him to remove overseas student numbers from migration targets, reports BBC News.
MALAYSIA
Two-year moratorium on new private institutions
There are too many private colleges in Malaysia and so the government has disallowed new ones to be set up in the next two years, writes Priya Kulasagaran for The Star.
DENMARK
Universities bemoan difficulty of employing foreigners
After the centre-left government assumed power in 2011, it stressed that attracting highly skilled foreigners was a vital prerequisite for Denmark’s ability to compete internationally. But despite promises to ease immigration restrictions, the government has made it more expensive and difficult for universities to hire foreigners, reports The Copenhagen Post.
CANADA
Universities warn of graduate shortages
Six British Columbia universities have ramped up their push for an increase in government funding, releasing a report that shows the province’s economy will soon be facing a shortage of thousands of university and college graduates, writes Jonathan Fowlie for The Vancouver Sun.
CANADA
University finds scientists published ‘falsified’ images
A celebrated Montreal scientist and a senior executive at one of the world’s biggest drug companies co-authored a study that contains “intentionally contrived and falsified” images, according to a report from McGill University, writes Margaret Munro for Postmedia News.
PALESTINE
Gaza university’s female dress code declared illegal
Palestinian Authority Minister of Higher Education Ali Jarbawi last weekend issued an official condemnation of a Gaza university’s decision to implement an ‘Islamic’ dress code for female students, reports Ma’an.
UNITED STATES
Higher education giving to reach pre-recession levels
Colleges and universities depend largely on donations, and if one estimate holds true, giving to higher education institutions is on track to exceed the watermark set before the 2009 recession, writes Whitney Burdette for The State Journal.
UNITED STATES
Endowment returns flat for universities
After two strong years, college and university endowments lost ground slightly during the fiscal year ending last 30 June, with their investments declining 0.3% on average, according to a new study, writes Justin Pope for Bloomberg Businessweek.
GLOBAL
How Facebook can ruin study abroad
Taking an administrative leave in Benin for the past six months provided an eye-opening contrast to my first study-abroad experience in Mexico City back in 1980. Of particular note was the insidious impact of new communication technologies on living and learning in another culture, writes Robert Huesca for The Chronicle of Higher Education.