19 September 2017 Register to receive our free newsletter by email each week
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UNITED STATES
US: Universities face transgender issues head-on
With issues of gender identity out in the open in America, more young people are publicly defining themselves as transgender and are pushing university administrators to recognise diversity more openly. Some American universities are addressing those needs head-on to help transgender students integrate into campus life without labels.
KENYA
How Kenyatta’s leader shattered the glass ceiling
Olive Mugenda is vice-chancellor of Kenyatta University, Kenya’s second largest institution by student numbers. For years she knocked on the doors of management, quietly but very persistently. When they opened, she entered enthusiastically – and made a major impact. She spoke to University World News for the latest in our article series on African university leaders.
KENYA
How Kenyatta’s leader shattered the glass ceiling
Olive Mugenda is vice-chancellor of Kenyatta University, Kenya’s second largest institution by student numbers. For years she knocked on the doors of management, quietly but very persistently. When they opened, she entered enthusiastically – and made a major impact. She spoke to University World News for the latest in our article series on African university leaders.
EGYPT
EGYPT: Academics struggle with no pay rise for 25 years
The monthly salary Tareq Al Desouki earns from his job as a medical professor at a university in Egypt's Nile Delta barely covers his family's needs for one week. He depends on his earnings from a private clinic to make both ends meet. "But what about the thousands of university professors who do not have a private clinic to earn enough to cope with the soaring costs of living?" complains Desouki, a leading member of the University Teaching Staff Club, a union pushing for substantial increases in the salaries of instructors in Egypt's government-run universities. Last month, lecturers staged a symbolic half-day nationwide strike, the first in Egypt's academic life, to demand better wages and working conditions.
CYPRUS
CYPRUS: Politics puts brake on university co-operation
For an island of less than a million people Cyprus is well served with universities. It has nine of them, to be precise.
UNITED KINGDOM
GLOBAL: The smart money is on Australia
The academic world is becoming a smaller place, with ever increasing numbers of students studying overseas and staff collaborating across continents. OECD official Andreas Schleicher talks to Brendan O'Malley about why some countries have turned higher education into a leading export industry and others struggle to compete.
RUSSIA
RUSSIA: Putin’s new dissidents
Russia’s ageing but revered scientific geniuses are on collision course with the Kremlin after the 1,200-strong members of the country’s leading scientific body rejected government proposals to seize control of its vast property holdings.
UNITED STATES
US: Keeping stem cell research alive
In an era of reduced federal funding in America for medical research, scientists at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle were thrilled to receive a $10 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) – the nation’s premier medical research agency.
UNITED STATES
US: Funding cuts threaten quality at state universities
Soaring student fees, huge fundraising drives and controversial corporate donations have not made up for a sharp decline in the state's commitment to higher education, reports the Los Angeles Times.
GREECE
Greece: Education squares up to the new government
The return of the conservative government in Greece for a second four-year period, albeit with a marginal majority of just two seats in the 300-seat parliament, is likely to inflame its bitter dispute with the nation’s academic community over the reform of Article 16 of the Constitution.
RUSSIA
RUSSIA: Religious revival troubles Vitaly Ginzburg
For a man who has just turned 91, Nobel-prize winning physicist Vitaly Ginzburg remains amazingly active in his intellectual life and continues to attract controversy.
CANADA
CANADA: A scholarship puppy with big paws
The mice seem calmer in Sunday Bisong’s Canadian lab. The doctoral student’s rodent subjects require a “serene environment” for the neuro-behavioral work he is conducting.
GLOBAL: Universities sign up for UN Academic Impact
For the last six years the United Nations has been pursuing a novel idea: gathering academic research globally into a practical framework. Last November, the idea finally came to fruition when Secretary General Ban Ki Moon launched the UN Academic Impact in New York. So far, nearly 600 universities have signed up to participate, making the initiative one of the fastest-growing cooperative measures of its kind.
AFRICA
Southern African universities association – What next?
The Southern African Regional Universities Association has completed its first phase, with funding ended and most of its staff gone. But there remains a need to drive regional higher education collaboration, according to Dr John Butler-Adam: “What happens next will require new approaches, nuanced strategising and strong implementation skills.”