01 August 2015 Register to receive our free newsletter by email each week
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AUSTRALIA
Schools are the new battleground for foreign students
School education should be used as a recruiting ground for foreign students to secure more higher education enrolments, according to a Victoria government paper examining how to combat rising competition from universities in Asian countries.
MOZAMBIQUE
Grappling with plagiarism in universities
Banishing academic dishonesty could help Mozambique nurture original thinkers who are economically efficient and socially suited to develop the country. But this will only be possible if administrators work with professors and students to build strong measures to combat widespread plagiarism, which is hampering the production of quality graduates.
EUROPE
European student union's warning over Bologna dream
The European Students’ Union has warned that the Bologna process, which seeks to harmonise and reform higher education across the continent, is in danger of becoming obsolete because of uneven implementation and poor follow-up of commitments by many European countries.
JAPAN
New era of university-industry collaboration launched
Research collaboration between Japanese universities and businesses is expanding, with increasing industrial funding for technology and the government pushing for scientific development to underpin local and national economic growth.
AFRICA
Linking universities and marginalised communities
Through innovation and inclusive development, universities could be instrumental in fighting poverty and expanding opportunities for marginalised African communities, ongoing research has shown. An array of factors contribute to the success of initiatives, such as communication, enabling access to knowledge, steady funding and aligning activities with national priorities.
BURUNDI
Students flee US embassy camp, claim police harassment
University students in troubled Burundi have claimed to University World News that they are being targeted for harassment, including death threats, by security forces and the police – especially the hundreds who took refuge near the American embassy after the government closed the University of Burundi.
EUROPE
UK, Germany and France top ERC advanced grant awards
The European Research Council, or ERC, has announced 190 recipients of its Advanced Grant awards, under the Horizon 2020 research programme. The grants are aimed at supporting groundbreaking ideas that may be risky to pursue but that reap exceptional gains. More than half went to researchers in just three countries.
AFRICA
Steady progress for Africa’s 19 centres of excellence
Most of the 19 African centres of excellence being strengthened through a US$150 million World Bank initiative are up and running. Progress includes 3,510 students enrolled for specialised short courses, masters or PhDs – nearly 1,500 of them from other countries in the region. The project is now expanding from seven West African countries, to East and Southern Africa.
GLOBAL
Where academics are hounded as ‘enemies’ of the state
A new report from the Scholars at Risk Academic Freedom Monitoring Project has revealed that in many places state authorities are using violence, imprisonment and lower levels of intimidation to silence students and academics with opposing points of view.
UNITED STATES
Removing confederate flags on campus is just a start
It’s hard for Charles K Ross to shake his first image of the University of Mississippi. He was watching a televised football game in 1994, and the Ole Miss stadium was a sea of Confederate-flag-waving fans. Ross was appalled. A flurry of changes since then have made the campus a more welcoming and inclusive place.
GERMANY
DAAD celebrates 90 years of exchanges
The German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD, celebrated its 90th anniversary this month. Although it was once hijacked by the Nazis, it now plays a key role in the academic world, and contributes to peace-building by enabling students from war-torn countries to continue their higher education.
GLOBAL
Venezuelan students abroad suffer in currency rule trap
An abrupt change last autumn in Venezuela’s currency control policy has left potentially thousands of Venezuelan tertiary students worldwide without funds they had earmarked for education abroad, putting them at risk of dropping out and of violating immigration laws.
GLOBAL
Countries fail to retain foreign students in job market
International students are increasingly seen as ‘designer’ or ‘model immigrants’ for the labour markets of their host countries – perfectly positioned to alleviate future talent shortages, particularly in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. But while most would like to stay and work after graduation, many cannot find employment.
AFRICA
DRUSSA – Growing evidence-based research and uptake
For seven years, engineer Dr Albert Rugumayo has been teaching a module on energy policy and planning to masters students at Uganda’s flagship Makerere University. He is now a fellow of Development Research Uptake in Sub-Saharan Africa, or DRUSSA, which aims to build capacity in universities to improve Africa’s research usage.
UNITED STATES
Conflict over narrative puts spotlight on ethnography
Late last month, what began as a book review in an obscure publication blew up into a major controversy that tarnished sociology’s most-buzzed-about young star. At issue: whether the sociologist, Alice Goffman, had participated in a felony while researching her ethnographic study of young black men caught up in America's criminal justice system.
CHINA
University collaboration takes the Silk Road route
China has launched a new international alliance of universities to back up its huge infrastructure plan – the mammoth ‘One Belt, One Road’ project – along the ancient Silk Road route, a byword for trade and cultural exchanges between Asia and Europe.
AFRICA
Mathematical sciences investments could change Africa
Africa largely missed the analogue technology revolution 50 years ago. Experts say the digital age will come to an end faster. There is a need to position Africa to catch up with information and communication technology and be viewed as a global player, said Thierry Zomahoun, president and CEO of the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences.
GERMANY
Professor passes degree denied by Nazis, aged 102
A 102-year-old has been awarded her doctoral degree in Hamburg. Paediatrician and Professor of Medicine Ingeborg Syllm-Rapoport was denied her title under the Nazis because her mother was a Jew. She sat her oral last year despite being barely able to see and passed summa cum laude.
THAILAND
Continued curbs on academic freedom under military rule
One year after Thailand’s military coup in May 2014, some prominent university rectors have secured high positions within the military government. But the suppression of dissident academics critical of the military junta continues unabated and student protests have been curbed, including three demonstrations on the anniversary of the coup.
EUROPE
Research reveals secret to better international-isation
Higher education institutions which are regarded as “leading” in internationalisation have elaborated “separate strategic plans for internationalisation, as opposed to having internationalisation incorporated into the overall institutional strategy”, according to new research.
INDIA
Higher education policy lacks direction, say academics
When Prime Minister Narendra Modi came to power in May 2014, many academics were hopeful about the future of India’s higher education system after years of seeing the quality of university education undermined by political and bureaucratic interference. One year on, there is disappointment over continued meddling and the lack of a clear higher education direction.
HONG KONG
Student federation faces uncertain future
The Hong Kong Federation of Students shot to the limelight during pro-democracy protests last year, but the university student alliance is facing an uncertain future and a severely curbed political role after four of its eight constituent university unions recently voted to leave the Federation.
UGANDA
Entrepreneurship mentors help graduates to create jobs
In Uganda as elsewhere, recent graduates are learning a tough lesson – a university education is no guarantee of a job. More than half of people under 30 are without full-time employment, and the problem is particularly acute among degree holders. Now new initiatives are teaching graduates and students the entrepreneurial skills they need to survive.
CHILE
Scandals put teaching of economics in the dock
The spate of financial scandals that are rocking Chile – including the jailing of three former ‘star students’ of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile’s economics and administration faculty – has stirred a wholesome debate in the country on the importance of ethics in the teaching of economics.
GLOBAL
LinkedIn: the future of global university rankings?
Could LinkedIn provide a better alternative to existing university ranking systems with more of a focus on career outcomes? LinkedIn university rankings will evolve over time and have the potential to be a game changer in helping students make informed choices.