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GLOBAL
Newton's List database to boost research
Newton's List is an online clearinghouse offering funding opportunities for researchers, students and educators seeking global scientific collaborations. It was launched last year by the US National Science Foundation and CRDF Global, an independent, non-profit organisation promoting international scientific and technical collaboration through grants, technical resources and training.

During the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago last month, members of CRDF Global provided live demonstrations of the research funding platform.

User-driven and open to researchers and students from around the globe, Newton's List is designed to enhance the quality and impact of international scientific research by providing grant-seekers with easier access to funding opportunities in the natural sciences, engineering, STEM education and the social sciences - all in a single location.

"NSF has formed a partnership with CRDF Global to facilitate opportunities for US researchers and students to engage in international research collaboration, particularly given the increasingly global nature of science engagement," said NSF programme director Dr DeAndra Beck.

"In this respect, Newton's List is intended to be a free, user-based platform to connect funding providers and funding seekers."

Examples of current funding opportunities include research grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, international travel grants from TechWomen, and African agricultural innovation grants from the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation.

Newton's List provides a free tool for non-profit funding agencies, universities and industry to reach a broader community, maximising their potential to attract innovative international research.

Organisations with funding opportunities on Newton's List range from small groups such as the National Research Foundation of South Africa, the World Academy of Sciences, and Tubitak, a Turkish research council, to the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and USAID.

"Global science collaboration strengthens the quality of research in all countries," said CRDF Global president and chief executive officer Cathy Campbell. "It generates new knowledge and fosters mutually beneficial relationships across borders.

"As a grant-making organisation, the benefits of Newton's List are clear. But there is also great value for young and early-career researchers in areas with limited resources, and for universities seeking to expand their international research capacities," said Campbell.

CRDF Global was established in 1995 to promote international scientific and technical collaboration through grants, technical resources and training. It supports emerging science and technology infrastructure in more than 40 countries in Eurasia, the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia.
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